WALKING BY TASMANIA’S LAKE ST CLAIR

It's called Platypus Bay, though we're unlikely to spot any in the middle of a clear day, Dusk and dawn are platypus times.

It’s called Platypus Bay, though we’re unlikely to spot any in the middle of a clear day, Dusk and dawn are platypus times.


The weather is changeable and we’re not well equipped for a serious hike.

Fortunately there are short walks from the Lake St Clair Visitor Centre that suit us perfectly.

As more intrepid adventurers stride in, drop their packs and order pizzas, having completed their 7-day trek along the famous Overland Track, we set out for a stroll along the lakeside to Watersmeet, carrying nothing but a camera.

Lake St Clair is well set up for walking. If it seems a little too well organised, remember that it's done not so much to make life easier for hikers, but to protect the plants by the track.

Lake St Clair is well set up for walking. If the boardwalk takes some of the adventure out of the experience, we remember that it’s there not so much to make life easier for hikers, but to protect the delicate plants by the track.

There is something different about Tasmanian forest. While the eucalyptus trees look similar to those on the mainland, in the island forest they’re joined by the horizontal foliage of myrtle beech, and the moss and lichens add colour at eye level.
I love the bright green splattered against the dark rocks.

I love the bright green splattered against the dark rocks.

Lichen on the boles of myrtle trees (I think).

Lichen on the boles of myrtle trees (I think).

On a day like today, Lake St Clair constantly changes; it’s clear and blue one minute, then grey and choppy the next.

That's our accommodation at Pumphouse Point in the distance.

That’s our accommodation at Pumphouse Point in the distance.


A once mighty tree felled by termites in the stump.

A once mighty tree felled by termites in the stump.

We’re hoping to see wildlife. There are plenty of birds, but the only animals we spot are a pademelon (a sort of small wallaby) and an echidna. Both scuttle away before I can pull out the camera. Probably we’d see more if we hung around a campsite as night was falling and the possums come out looking for food left in the tents of the unwary.

But by dusk the weather has closed in, and we were foraging ourselves, back at our salubrious accommodation at Pumphouse Point.

And the sun goes down on another day.

And the sun goes down on another day.


The writer was the guest of Tourism Tasmania and Pumphouse Point.

3 Comments

Filed under Hiking, Travel-Australia

3 responses to “WALKING BY TASMANIA’S LAKE ST CLAIR

  1. Angela Highstead

    Memories. In 2007 caught the ferry to top end of the lake and walked the 17.5kms back to the visitors centre. Rained most of the way and any photos of myself decidedly unglamorous but a wonderful day. Thank you for the photographic reminders.

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