OUR SECOND OLDEST NATIONAL PARK – and the most beautiful?

Russell Falls started it all.

19th century interest in Russell Falls started it all.

Australia’s oldest national park is the Royal National Park south of Sydney. Mt Field wasn’t far behind.

It was declared a nature reserve in 1885 and became a national park in 1916. It also has a dubious distinction as the place the last known Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was captured in 1933; they’ve changed the rules about taking nearly extinct species out of national parks since then.

Now it is one of Tasmania’s most popular parks, partly because it is only 64km from Hobart, and partly because it contains some of the most beautiful and varied terrain in the state, the country or indeed on the planet. We were happy to join the day-trippers on a short walk to the gorgeous Russell Falls – carrying the camera of course.

The track leads through a stand of massive swamp gums, some of the largest and oldest  trees in Australia.

The track leads through a stand of massive swamp gums, some of the largest and oldest trees in Australia.

The fallen trunks are covered with moss and fungi.

The fallen trunks are covered with moss and fungi.

The creeks are small, not promising any great surge of water over the falls.

The creeks are small, not promising any great surge of water over the falls.

It's the spread of water and the foliage around it that makes them so attractive.

It’s the spread of water and the foliage around it that makes them so attractive.

I was able to put my recent waterfall shooting lesson into practice, using the timer to slow the shutter speed and create the ‘soft water’ effect.

Russell Falls in detail.

Russell Falls in detail.

The writer was the guest of Tourism Tasmania.

5 Comments

Filed under Hiking, travel photography, Travel-Australia

5 responses to “OUR SECOND OLDEST NATIONAL PARK – and the most beautiful?

  1. Angela Highstead

    Fungi – magical. Richard do you have a 10x magnifying eyeglass? I’ve looked at lichen with the naked eye, just looking brown and dead, however ‘through the looking glass’ covered in tiny blue flowers-magical too.

  2. 100wordstowanderlust

    What stunning photos!

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