THE TALE OF THE LAGUIOLE KNIFE – were we skinned?

If a deal is too good to be true...?

If a deal is too good to be true…?

Browsing the brocante market in the French town of Bergerac, our friend Carla spots a bargain.

It’s a Laguiole sommelier’s knife, brand new, still in its box. In a typically kind and generous gesture, she buys it (‘for a song,’ she assures us) and presents it to me as a gift.

Bric-a-brac in Bergerac.

Bric-a-brac in Bergerac.

I’m delighted to have it. Another knowledgeable friend had advised us to visit Laguiole, where for centuries such knives have been made and sold. Unfortunately we weren’t able to include it on the itinerary of this French road trip. But now I’m the proud owner of a Laguiole knife – normally retailing for something over EUR150.

It’s only on close inspection that we find the little plastic label stuck on the blade – ‘Fabrique en chine’. Merde!

Mevrouw T does a little googling and discovers the following:
“Laguiole” is not a reference to a specific company. Instead, it describes a style of knife…the name “Laguiole” was never patented and many companies use the term…”

Does it matter that my new toy was made in China? It’s an elegant thing, it came from France, ‘Laguiole’ is spelled correctly on both knife and packaging (no mean feat, I know!) and someone even had the decency to write the ‘Made in China’ label in French.

And it does a very fine job of pulling the cork out of a bottle of Bergerac wine.

Merci beaucoup, Carla!

Merci beaucoup, Carla!

1 Comment

Filed under France

One response to “THE TALE OF THE LAGUIOLE KNIFE – were we skinned?

  1. David

    It is probably well made, but doesn’t it grate just a little. Its just like those Aussie Koala souvenirs made in China, well made too but shouldn’t we be making them ourselves?
    I spent many months researching my purchase of a Laguiole shepherd’s knife. To my amazement some of the biggest brands have their knives made in China. Finally settled on a Laguiole en Aubrac which is guaranteed “Laguiole Origine” authentic and you can actually check which craftsman made it by the different signature patterns on the spine of the handle.
    I’m trying not to sound like a knife snob, but I am a collector on a strict budget and just love my knives, but this one is special.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s